Do you want to know the difference between the 28 Nosler and 6.5 Creedmoor cartridges? In this blog post, we will compare and contrast these two cartridges to help you decide which one is right for you. Both of these cartridges are popular among hunters and shooters, but they have different strengths and weaknesses. So, let’s take a closer look at each cartridge and see which one comes out on top!

28 Nosler vs 6.5 Creedmoor

The 28 Nosler was introduced in 2015, and it is based on the 26 Nosler cartridge. The 28 Nosler is a high-performance cartridge that is designed for long-range shooting. It has a maximum range of about 1000 yards and it can deliver extremely accurate shots. The 28 Nosler is also a very powerful cartridge, and it can take down large game animals with ease.

The downside of the 28 Nosler is that it is a bit more expensive than the average cartridge. Additionally, it requires a specialized rifle to shoot accurately at long range. If you are looking for a powerful and accurate cartridge for long-range shooting, then the 28 Nosler is a great choice. However, if you are on a budget or you don’t need the extra power, then the 26 Nosler might be a better option.

The other cartridge that we will be comparing is the popular and well-loved, Creedmoor. The Creedmoor was introduced in 2007 and it quickly became a favorite among shooters. The Creedmoor is designed for long-range shooting and it has a maximum range of about 1200 yards. It is also a very accurate cartridge, and it has less recoil than some of the other long-range cartridges on the market.

One downside of the Creedmoor is that it can be difficult to find ammunition for this cartridge. Additionally, the Creedmoor requires a specialized rifle to shoot accurately at long range. However, if you can find the right rifle and ammunition, the Creedmoor is an excellent choice for long-range shooting.

So, which cartridge is better? The 28 Nosler or the Creedmoor? It really depends on what you are looking for. If you need a powerful and accurate cartridge for long-range shooting, then the 28 Nosler is a great choice. However, if you are on a budget or you don’t need the extra power, then the Creedmoor might be a better option. Whichever cartridge you choose, make sure that you do your research to ensure that it is the best option for your needs.

.28 Nosler cartridge overview

The .28 Nosler is a belted, bottlenecked rifle cartridge designed for big game hunting. It was introduced in 2014 by Nosler. The .28 Nosler is the company’s first foray into the world of magnum cartridges.

The 28 Nosler case is based on the popular 26 Nosler case and shares many dimensions with the older cartridge. The shoulder diameter of the .28 nosler is slightly larger than that of the .26 nosler however, measuring 0.550 inches (13.97 mm) compared to 0.540 inches (13.72 mm). This results in a slight increase in case capacity over the .26 nosler, up from 86 grains H20 to 90 grains H20.

The .28 Nosler is a very high-pressure cartridge, with a maximum pressure rating of 65,000 psi. This allows for very high velocities to be achieved from relatively short barrel lengths. For example, Nosler’s factory ammunition is advertised to achieve a muzzle velocity of 3000 feet per second (fps) from a 24 inch barrel.

Factory loaded .28 Nosler ammunition is currently available from several manufacturers including Federal Premium, Hornady, and Nosler itself. Bullet weights range from 120 grains up to 175 grains. The most popular choices seem to be the 140 grain and 150 grain bullets however.

So how does the .28 Nosler compare to the other big name in magnum cartridges, the venerable .300 Winchester Magnum? Let’s take a look.

The .28 Nosler has a slightly larger case capacity than the .300 Winchester Magnum, up from 90 grains of H20 to 94 grains of H20. This results in slightly higher velocities being achievable from the .28 Nosler, especially with lighter bullet weights.

The .28 Nosler is also a very high-pressure cartridge, with a maximum pressure rating of 65,000 psi. This allows for very high velocities to be achieved from relatively short barrel lengths. For example, Nosler’s factory ammunition is advertised to achieve a muzzle velocity of 3000 feet per second (fps) from a 24 inch barrel.

In terms of factory loaded ammunition, the .28 Nosler is currently available from several manufacturers including Federal Premium, Hornady, and Nosler itself. Bullet weights range from 120 grains up to 175 grains. The most popular choices seem to be the 140 grain and 150 grain bullets however.

So what does all this mean? In short, the .28 Nosler is a very capable magnum cartridge that is able to achieve slightly higher velocities than the .300 Winchester Magnum. It is also available in a wide range of bullet weights, making it a versatile option for hunters. If you are in the market for a new magnum rifle cartridge, the .28 Nosler should definitely be at the top of your list.

 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge overview

The Creedmoor cartridge was designed in 2007 by Hornady and Ruger. It is based on the .308 Winchester case necked down to .277 caliber. The name “Creedmoor” comes from the site of the original long-range rifle competition, held in New York in 1876.

The Creedmoor was designed as a match cartridge for bolt-action and single-shot rifles. It has since become popular for use in AR-platform rifles as well. The creedmoor offers excellent accuracy and slightly less felt recoil than comparable cartridges such as the .308 Winchester or .30-06 Springfield.

Due to its popularity, there is a wide variety of ammunition available for the Creedmoor including factory loaded hunting rounds and match grade ammunition from a number of manufacturers.

If you are looking for an accurate and versatile cartridge for your bolt-action or AR-platform rifle, the Creedmoor is an excellent choice.

The .270 Winchester is another popular option for long-range shooters and hunters. It is based on the same .308 Winchester case but necked down to .277 caliber. The .270 Winchester offers slightly more energy than the Creedmoor but at the expense of increased felt recoil.

Check also: 28 Nosler vs 7mm: Which is the Best Cartridge for You?

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