There are a lot of factors to consider when zeroing your rifle for hunting. Of course, the most important thing is making sure that your shots will be accurate in the area you will be hunting. But what about the distance you will be shooting? What about the wind? And what about the elevation changes? In this blog post, we will discuss the best zero for 7mm Rem Mag cartridges when used for hunting purposes.

The Best Zero for 7mm Rem Mag

When zeroing your rifle for hunting, the most important thing is to make sure that your shots will be accurate in the area you will be hunting. For most hunters, this means making sure that your shots will be accurate within a certain range – usually 100 yards or less.

Of course, there are exceptions to this rule, and some hunters may need to shoot further than 100 yards depending on the game they are hunting and the terrain they are shooting in. But for the average hunter, 100 yards is a good starting point.

Once you have determined the maximum distance you will be shooting, you need to take into account the elevation changes in your area. If you live in an area with big elevation changes (i.e., if you are hunting in the mountains), you will need to zero your rifle at a different distance than if you live in an area with little elevation changes (i.e., if you are hunting in the plains). The reason for this is because your bullet will travel differently over different distances and through different elevations.

Elevation changes

If you are hunting in an area with big elevation changes, you will need to zero your rifle at a distance that takes into account the average elevation change between where you will be shooting and where your target is. For example, if you are hunting in the mountains and your target is 500 yards away, but the actual distance between you and your target varies from 400 yards at the bottom of the mountain to 600 yards at the top of the mountain, you will need to zero your rifle at 500 yards. This is because you will be shooting at the target’s average distance of 500 yards, even though the actual distance between you and the target may be different depending on where you are in the mountains.

If you are hunting in an area with little elevation changes, you will need to zero your rifle at a distance that takes into account the maximum distance your target can be from you. For example, if you are hunting in the plains and your target can only be shot at 100 yards away, but there is no way to tell how far away your target actually is (i.e., it could be 50 yards or it could be 150 yards), you will need to zero your rifle at 100 yards. This is because you will be shooting at the target’s maximum distance of 100 yards, even though the actual distance between you and the target may be different depending on where you are in relation to your target.

Once you have determined which zeroing method is best for your situation (i.e., whether or not there are big elevation changes), it is important that you use this information when choosing a scope for hunting purposes. You want to make sure that your scope has enough power and clarity so that when using it with these variables in mind, your shots will still hit their targets accurately. For example, if I were going deer hunting and zeroing my rifle at 300 yards, I would need a very powerful and clear scope because at that distance, my shot could be off by several inches and still hit the target.

Plain areas

However, if I were going to go hunting in an area where elevation changes are not a concern (i.e., plains), then I would need a scope with less power/clarity because even if my shots were slightly off, they should still hit the target accurately enough for me to hit it from any angle or position.

The key takeaway here is that when choosing your rifle’s zeroing method before you hunt, you must take into account both the maximum range of your targets and their average range as well so that no matter what kind of terrain you will be shooting in (mountains vs plains) or how far away from you your target will be, you can adjust your rifle’s zeroing distance to compensate and ensure accurate shots.

When hunting big game, the last thing you want is for your shot to go wide because of an incorrect zero. By understanding how to best zero your rifle for the terrain you’ll be shooting in and taking that information into account when selecting a scope, you’ll have one less thing to worry about while out in the field.

Make sure to practice at different ranges with this new information so that when it comes time for the hunt, everything falls into place just as it should. good starting point for figuring out how far away from a deer or elk you need to be before taking a ethical shot.. With practice anyone can make the shot, but it’s always best to be within range before pulling the trigger.

Zeroing at 300 yards

You probably already know that a 300 yard zero is recommended for most hunting rifles (some go as far out as 500 yards), but have you ever thought about why this distance is so important? It turns out there are many reasons. For starters, it allows hunters to take longer shots with less risk of missing or injuring their target by simply being closer than they would need otherwise.

This means if your rifle is set at 300 yards when aiming at something 100 feet away from you and then moves 20 feet towards its prey while trying not to make any noise – which could easily happen during an actual hunt!

But what happens if we adjust our scope’s elevation knob so that it’s zeroed at 300 yards instead of 100 feet? Well, now if our prey moves 20 feet closer than before without making any noise (which isn’t too unrealistic), we’re still able to hit them because they’re still within range thanks to being close enough due to the adjusted scope settings!

The thing is though… this isn’t always possible in real life situations. Sometimes there are obstacles between you and your target which makes it difficult for long distance shots but not impossible with practice or luck on both ends (hunter & hunted). And sometimes those obstacles aren’t even visible from where you stand – like a tree trunk growing out of solid ground directly behind an animal standing just beyond its reach.

If this were happening right now then the 300 yard zero would be of little help. In this case, a hunter would need to know his weapon and the lay of the land well enough beforehand to take into account these types of things before making a shot.

So what’s the best way to go about all of this? How do you determine your rifle’s maximum effective range for hunting big game in different terrain? The answer is actually simpler than you might think…all you need is a good map! With a map in hand, it becomes easy to see how far away your target will be at any given distance, taking into account hills, valleys, trees, rocks – anything that could potentially obstruct your view or cause an inaccuracy in your shots.

Simply put: if it’s not on the map, it’s not important. Once you have an idea of your rifle’s maximum range for different types of terrain, you can then begin to practice at those distances and find the best zeroing spot for each environment.

This is a generalized guide that covers most hunting situations, but there will always be unique cases where things don’t quite fit into this standard formula. As with anything else in life, experience is key – so get out there and start practicing!