Do you know the difference between a 7mm-08 and a 7mm mag? If not, don’t worry – you’re not alone. In this blog post, we will discuss the pros and cons of each cartridge so that you can decide which is the best for you.

The first thing to know is that the “08” in “07mm-08” stands for the year 1908, when this cartridge was designed. The “mag” in “07mm mag” stands for magnum, which means that this cartridge is a high-powered round. Now that we’ve got that out of the way, let’s take a look at the pros and cons of each cartridge.

7mm-08 vs 7mm Mag

PROS OF THE 07MM-08:

CONS OF THE 07MM-08:

PROS OF THE 07MM MAG:

CONS OF THE 07MM MAG:

So, which is the better cartridge? Well, it depends on what you’re looking for. If you want a more affordable round with less recoil and better accuracy, then the 07mm-08 is a good choice. However, if you’re looking for more power and longer range shooting, then the 07mm mag is a better choice.

Can you use 7mm-08 in a 7mm Rem Mag?

The simple answer is yes, you can use a round designed for one cartridge in a firearm chambered for the other cartridge. However, there are a few things to keep in mind if you plan on doing this. First, the overall length of the two cartridges is different. The difference is only 0.02 inches, but it’s still enough that you need to be aware of it. Second, the bullet diameter of the two cartridges is also slightly different. The difference is only 0.004 inches, but again, it’s something to be aware of. Finally, while the pressure levels of the two cartridges are similar, the pressure levels of commercial ammunition can vary significantly from one manufacturer to another.

Can a 7mm-08 shoot 7mm?

The answer to this question is a bit complicated. The simple answer is yes, a firearm chambered in .308 Winchester can fire .243 Winchester ammunition. However, there are a few things to keep in mind before doing so.

One thing to consider is that the .308 Winchester was designed for use with heavier bullets, typically ranging from 150-180 grains. Firing a lighter bullet, such as the .243’s standard 90 grain projectile, may result in less accuracy and penetration than desired. Additionally, due to the differences in case size between the two calibers, one must be sure that the chamber of their firearm is large enough to properly accommodate the larger diameter of the .243 round.

So while it is technically possible to shoot a .243 out of a .308 rifle, it is generally not recommended.

What is a 7mm-08 equivalent to?

A lot of people ask me what a good equivalent to the popular .308 Winchester is, and in my opinion, the answer is the .280 Remington. Now, some people might disagree with me on this one, but I think the .280 Remington is a great option for anyone looking for an all-around hunting rifle. It has plenty of power to take down large game animals, yet it’s still relatively efficient and easy to shoot. Plus, it’s got a bit more recoil than the .308 Winchester, so it’s not quite as punishing on your shoulder. So if you’re looking for a versatile hunting rifle that can do it all, I recommend checking out the .280 Remington.

Now, I know what you’re thinking. You’re probably wondering what a .280 Remington is equivalent to in terms of ballistics. Well, I did a little research and found that the .280 Remington is very comparable to the .308 Winchester in terms of trajectory and energy. So if you’re looking for a rifle that can shoot long range and hit hard, the .280 Remington is a great option.

Is 7mm-08 adequate for elk?

The answer to this question largely depends on the hunter and their individual hunting style. Some hunters may feel comfortable taking down an elk with a smaller caliber rifle, while others may prefer to err on the side of caution and choose a larger caliber option. Ultimately, it is up to the hunter to decide what they are comfortable with and what they feel will be the most effective for their needs.

That being said, there are some general things to keep in mind when deciding if a particular caliber is adequate for elk hunting. First, it is important to consider the average range at which you will be shooting. If you are planning on hunting in an area where shots are likely to be relatively close (under 200 yards), then a smaller caliber rifle may be just fine. However, if you are planning on hunting in an area where longer shots are more likely (over 200 yards), then a larger caliber option may be a better choice.

Second, it is also important to consider the types of terrain you will be hunting in. If you are planning on hunting in thick brush or timber, then a smaller caliber rifle may be a good option because it will allow you to more easily maneuver through the dense vegetation. On the other hand, if you are planning on hunting in open country where long range shots are more likely, then a larger caliber rifle may be the better choice.

Finally, it is also important to consider your own personal preferences and shooting abilities. If you feel more comfortable and confident with a larger caliber rifle, then that is probably the best option for you. On the other hand, if you are more comfortable with a smaller caliber rifle and feel confident in your ability to make accurate shots at long range, then that may be the better choice for you.

In the end, there is no “right” answer when it comes to deciding what caliber of rifle is adequate for elk hunting. It ultimately comes down to the individual hunter and what they feel most comfortable with.